Legality


Electric Bikes are significantly growing in popularity, and this shows no sign of slowing down, with the UK and European market expected to triple over the next few years. As more are joining the transition, the classifications are becoming slacker, yet, it is important to share these and show how they differ to a regular bike.
 
Electric bikes or E-Bikes, whether that be pre-built or converted with one of Gride's kits, are also known as Electrically Assisted Pedal Cycles (EAPC), and you do not need a license to ride one nor do they need to be registered, taxed or insured.
 
There are certain requirements which must be met for an Electric bike to fall into the EAPC category:
It must have pedals that can be used to propel it
Have a motor which is no larger than 250W
Boost your ride by no more than 15.5mph
Show either the power output or the manufacturer of the motor
     
    If a bike (two-wheeled, tricycles, tandems, recumbent etc.) complies with the these requirements, the bike is deemed suitable for on-road use and can be used and treated as a normal pedal bike. It can be used on any cycle paths or anywhere else that bikes are normally allowed.
     
    In the UK you must be over the age of 14 to ride an electric bike but it doesn’t need registering or taxing, nor does the rider need a license.
     
    If you own an E-Bike which doesn’t meet these regulations, either because the motor is over the 250W limit or any other reason, it will need to be registered with the DVLA, insured and taxed as a motor vehicle. In this circumstance, a helmet must be worn and a driving license is required. These bike’s cannot be used on cycle paths or any other place where a standard pedal bike can be used.
     
    Thumb Throttle:
    The UK law prohibits use of ‘Twist and Go’ throttle options meaning with one of these installed, your bike will not fall under the EAPC conformity. We have the right to sell these throttles, as they are safe for off-road use on private land. We can provide customers with these throttles but must have them accept the relevant terms and conditions so they are aware of the potential risks. More information can be found about thumb throttle legislation by clicking here.